THE BRITISH COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO ANIMALS
Our mission: To protect and enhance the quality of life for domestic, farm and wild animals in B.C.

 January 1, 2014

It’s been less than a week since New Year’s celebrations heralded a new year and new intentions to lead better lives. So how are your resolutions for 2014 coming along?

Even if you’re already faltering on your big plans to exercise more often or eat healthier, it’s never too late to start forming good habits. Or to help make the world a better place – especially for those who have no voice.

Exercising with your pet is a great place to start. Here’s a list of resolutions tailored to animal lovers who are looking for ways to help make life better for the animals in B.C.’s many communities:

  1. ID your pet. The BC SPCA reunites thousands of lost animals with their families every year, but many are never claimed because they do not have any identification. Make sure your pets have ID tags on their collars and a microchip or a tattoo and remember to keep the information updated.

  2. Get yourself and your dog off the couch and outdoors for some fresh air and exercise. Most dogs need walking at least twice daily to stay healthy and the exercise is beneficial to you, too. If you don’t have a dog, volunteer to walk dogs at your local shelter.

  3. Spread the word about the crucial importance of spaying or neutering pets – this helps the huge problem of pet overpopulation and helps your pets stay healthier as well.

  4. If you’re considering getting a new pet, make sure the BC SPCA or other animal shelter in your community is your first adoption option. Avoid buying pets from online sites – you could be supporting puppy mills by purchasing pets that way.

  5. Make humane food choices. Commit to buying foods raised according to high animal welfare standards. Look for SPCA Certified products in the meat and dairy sections of your grocery store. You can also check out our website to find out where you can buy SPCA Certified products in your community.

  6. Switch from ethylene glycol antifreeze – toxic to animals – in your vehicle to pet-friendly propylene-based antifreeze.

  7. Wildlife is often injured as the result of human activity. Properly dispose of items that can potentially harm wild animals, such as household cleaners, plastic bags and cigarette butts. Even better – switch to environmentally friendly cleaners and use fabric bags instead of plastic.

  8. Help a homeless or wild animal get the care they need. Donate to help homeless, injured and abused animals in need throughout the province.

  9. Volunteer at your local BC SPCA branch or humane society. The help volunteers provide makes a huge difference every day in the lives of shelter animals. You can help care for animals at a shelter or foster team in your own home. The BC SPCA couldn’t care for the 29,000 animals we help each year without volunteers. Get involved today.

  10.  Visit your local BC SPCA branch or other animal shelter regularly to donate at least one item on their wish list, such as leashes, animal toys, food and more.

  11.  Advocate for animal welfare issues such as puppy mills, feral cats and many others by contacting your city council and community leaders to help effect change through regulatory bylaws.

  12.  Make sure your pet is cared for in the event of your death. The BC SPCA offers a number of options to secure your faithful friend’s future, from a free basic registration of your pet to ensure he is adopted into a new, loving home to variably priced premium and custom plans that take into account every aspect of your pet’s needs.

Browse our website for more information on how you can help animals.

The British Columbia Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals is a not-for-profit organization reliant on public donations. Our mission is to protect and enhance the quality of life for domestic, farm and wild animals in B.C.

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